Nov 15 2010

10/28 Illumination

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Benjy’s relationship with Caddy is up for discussion. During his section Benjy is always clinging to Caddy. He listens to her when she speaks and follows her directions. I found it interesting that Caddy makes Benjy feel happy and is able to comfort him. But Benjy has the ability to make her feel disgusted and disappointed with herself. Caddy returns from a date, she was able to face her parents; she doesn’t seem to consider their feelings about her interaction with a male. Instead she considers her brothers feelings. “Her eyes flew at me, and away.”(68) She can’t even face him but I only assume it is because she is disappointed with herself. “I went toward her, crying, and she shrank against the wall” (69) she seems to fear his judgment because she doesn’t want him to know what she has done. But Benjy already senses a difference within her. Before that night she was pure sweet Caddy that simply smelled like trees.  He also focus on her eyes he says “Her eyes ran…I saw her eyes” I feel like she fears that her eyes will tell the truth. Lastly when she tries to hide from Benjy by putting her arm across her face I think she is disgusted with herself and he has made her feel so belittled by simply crying and starring at her.

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Nov 15 2010

10/26 April 7, 1928 Come alive already!

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I would love to lie and say the book came alive at a certain point and I began to understand everything but I wont because instead I felt like I was thrown into the middle of a story and I had to fight in order to put the puzzle together. I questioned what was the problem with Benjy and what part of the memory connected to the past or the present. At times I felt like saying “hold on there Buddy, no more italic memories! You explain this first.” But I didn’t have Faulkner around to explain. I was also confused about Benjy’s age because at one point he is 33 and I only know this because of the birthday cake. Since there is so much reflection on the past I seriously thought the book was going to be about time traveling. I know it’s irrelevant to even mention that but, I was that lost or maybe I’ve been reading too much science fiction. But I will say Faulkner knows how to keep you interested because you are reading more thinking there will be an explanation.

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Nov 15 2010

10/21 The sequence of frames…

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While reading Persepolis I found her relationships with god and religion most interesting. On page 6 Satrapi said she was the last prophet. Then on page 8 she speaks to god and informs him that she is not ready to be a prophet. As she obtains knowledge about the revolution she begins to come away from god. Then on page 13 she no longer even wants to speak of becoming a prophet. These frames seem to show the gradual decrease in Satrapi’s connection and believe in god. After these pages god does not appear to her as often. The last time god appears to her is after the execution of her uncle Anoosh. She tells god “get out of my life!!! I never want to see you” (70) she has completely broken away from god. The child that once wanted to be the great prophet turned away from god entirely. After commanding god out of her life she is lost and floating in space. I thought it was interesting that after she turns her back on god the bombing occurs.

The last part that stood out to me was on page 125. The reason this stood out to me was because there is such misery within one page. Because this story is written in comic form I did not take it so seriously. But these frames actually made me feel the strong emotion sadness. The 18 year old communist was executed and Satrapi’s uncle dies before seeing his son one last time. The uncles’ death could have been avoided if he had received the care for his heart attack. “The real passport arrived the same day” (he was buried) this line made me feel such anger because the government had been too late to save a life. I think the real reason this frame pissed me off so much was because my mother also had a heart attack. I felt like the government took away Satrapi’s uncle from his family. The last word at bottom “he never got to see his son” added to the anger and sadness that accumulated within me. After these frames I read Satrapi’s story very differently because besides the revolution she tried to live a normal life.

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Nov 15 2010

Persepolis the Islamic Revolution

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10/19

Satrapi, as she is telling her story she keeps events a lined with the actual history of the Islamic Revolution. She reflected on the Shah being over thrown. Soon after this the Islamic Republic came into power.
The Islamic Revolution was against the influence of the West, but Satrapi points out oil had a strong influence as well. She makes it obvious that the extremist were against westernization. She wrote about when she bought smuggled in cassettes and the time her parents also smuggled in posters from Turkey. Satrapi writes about actual restrictions on women, parties, music, and cinemas. As I read Persepolis I thought perhaps she exaggerated but history only confirms it. What I would think is unimaginable is actually her reality.

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Nov 09 2010

April 8, 1928

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I have mixed feelings about the ending because it’s not exactly what I expected. I thought Caddy would make an appearance any moment because in her letter we get the impression that she will be checking up on Miss Quentin. I also thought that once Caddy would return, the family would be united and Benjy would finally have her back in his life. I was disappointed because I wanted some comfort or justice for Benjy.  I guess I was looking for the overly exaggerated happy ever after. Instead Miss Quentin takes her money back from Jason. She takes back money that was rightfully hers, so I’m not disappointed in her. To an extent I want to believe that eventual miss Quentin goes back to her mother Caddy because earlier in the third section she asked why she couldn’t go back to her mother. But then again we’ve Miss Quentin and she most likely ran way with the man with the red tie. As for Jason’s downfall I say good for him because he had such a rotten personality. He deserves every bit of misfortune t because he focused so much on causing others misery.  Had he been kind to Miss Quentin, all of this would have been avoided.

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Nov 04 2010

”April 6, 1928″

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AHHHHHHH!! This section seems to be so strongly connected with the first section. After thinking so hard about what is clarified, at I first thought okay, Caddy is no longer with Herbert because he learns the child is not his. Also Caddy’s mother doesn’t seem to want any connection with her daughter, but she does take in the baby Quentin. At first I thought this was perhaps the third Quentin that would be introduced in the book. Then it all hit me the female Quentin from April 7th 1928 is the same Quentin Jason seems to argue with on April 6th 1928. Everyone else probably already understood this but for me it was such a revelation. So I looked back to when Benjy sees her with her ‘beau” Jack on page 48 and the connection thickened! Benjy notices his RED TIE, he says “He had a red tie. The sun was red on it.”(49)  This is the very man Jason sees Quentin with. I have to say this intertwining that Faulkner creates through out the sections is incredible.

 This not relevant to the assignment but as I read Jason’s section I kept on thinking how much I hated him. He was always shown such affection by his mother, he was never treated cruelly. How could he grow up to become such a money hungry, cold hearted, conniving, cynical, twisted minded person? He does not care for anyone but himself. He steals from his mother, sister, and niece. My harsh feeling toward him formulate when Caddy is secretly at the graveyard, I believe her father has passed and she has also put flowers by Quentin’s grave. She begs Jason to let her see little Quentin, and all he is interested in is how much money she is willing to pay. He takes a hundred dollars from her and basically teases her because he literally lets her see Quentin less than a minute because he has Mink drive away as he is showing her the baby. The heart breaking things is that Caddy is actually running after the car.  Jason finds such enjoyment in the misery he causes others.

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Oct 05 2010

The Waste Land…

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I’d like to say that after going over the poem “The Waste Land” I understand the meaning but truthfully I don’t. I only know now that the poem seems to revolve around a relationship between and man and woman. But I was still left confused because T.S. Eliot’s poem is intertwined with another text from Shakespeare and Dante’s inferno. I don’t hate the poem because I don’t fully comprehend it because there are lines that I like and think I understand. But I still believe the poem is depressing and morbid.  The person seems to insist on withdrawing from society because he is disgusted by it.

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Sep 30 2010

The Waste Land

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As I read The Waste Land I found myself very confused, the more I read the less sense the poem made. The poem actually made me think of the black plague caused by the rats and the dead bodies that are described. I thought of the plague when I first read “White bodies naked on the low damp ground/ And bones cast in a little low dry garret,/ Rattled by the rat’s foot only, year to year.”(192-195) the poem seemed very depressing and morbid. I think it was hard to understand the poem because it is broken into parts. I also tried to look up the poem and used the website http://eliotswasteland.tripod.com/ the site was informative but also added to the poem, making it more complicated to understand.  Sure I want to say the poem was good but I wasn’t sure what was going on and I didn’t get the full impact of the poem because I was so lost.

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Sep 28 2010

“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

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9/28   “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

“And would it have been worth it, after all” (line 99) could be interpreted many different ways. At first I believe Prufrock is generally referring to life and asking if his life was worth living. This line could also be referring to Prufrock’s interaction with the women he drinks tea with. He has joined these women for tea on multiple occasions. He never asked them the “overwhelming question” (line 6) which he repeats in line 93. Prufrock is questioning; his efforts on whether he should engage in contact with these women. But his low self esteem is his barrier. Even if he did socialize with the women, would it be worth it. Based on the whole poem Prufrock is referring to the outcome of socializing.  Would he have a friend, acquaintance, simple conversation or even sexual relations? Or would he be a fool and would they point of his flaws like his thinning hair and his thinning arms and legs.

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Sep 28 2010

9/23 W.B. Yeats

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  9/23 W.B. Yeats

I personally enjoyed reading the poem “An Irish Airman Foresees His Death” because many of the lines could be read quiet literally. The lines still maintained such powerful meaning. The line “those that I fight I do not hate/those that I guard I do not love.”Based on these lines I get the impression that the Airman (Major Gregory) did not believe in the cause nor that the war was worth fighting. I also found different interpretations of the poem, Major Gregory took part in the war in order to fly. Through the poem we understand he was not recruited. He wasn’t interested in the “cheering crowds” or the honor that he would receive. He fought on “a lonely impulse of delight/ drove to this tumult in the clouds” even though Major Gregory would die, a chance to fly among the clouds seemed to be the equal price. Being among the clouds also can be interpreted as a heavenly out of body experience. On the journey before death he found a form of serenity.  This view was different from my first impression because I thought Yeats was wounded by losing   Major Gregory. Yeats may have believed many fought and lost their lives for a fight they did not stand by.

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