Archive for November, 2010

Nov 18 2010

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Mom will kick your…

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The story that I liked the most was “How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie” because it’s a young boy that is trying to “get some” but he constantly mentions his mother because she will beat him if, of course she finds out his intentions for staying home and if he forgets to put the cheese back in the refrigerator. I found this story funny because he’s trying to act mature by inviting a girl but he’s also scared of his mother beating the heck out of him. In the very beginning I get the impression that he is embarrassed by the life he lives and his nationality because he hides the government cheese, puts away pictures of his cousins in the campo and hides a picture of himself with an Afro. BUT he is willing to use his Spanish to impress a girl. He says “order everything in your busted-up Spanish. Let her correct you if she’s Latina and amaze her if she’s black.” (145) basically there seems to be a right time and a wrong time to acknowledge his heritage. He creates a profile for each type of these girls, which are estimating what base he’ll go to. The story isn’t just about creating the different profiles. It is about self disappointment, the hiding of things was the beginning, the comment he makes about his mother knowing the scent of the tear gas,  I scenes disappointment. Furthermore, when is says “Tell her that you love her hair…because, in truth, you love them more than you love your own.” (147 I get the impression that he’s not happy with the way he looks.
And lastly the child within him comes out after the girl leaves because he doesn’t waste his time alone. He makes sure to watch his shows because, YES!!! None of his family members are around to nag him. Even sleep at this time would be a waste.
Most importantly “Put the government cheese back in its place before your MOM KILLS YOU.”

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Nov 15 2010

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Junot Diaz 1st four stories

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IIn class we were asked which of the four stories did we like most, but I didn’t like either story. I don’t mean to seem negative but I felt like the children lost their purity a long time even before we read these stories. In the first story Ysrael the older brother is sexually active with girls from the campo and the capital. We don’t get to see the children’s childhood. In Fiesta the children would rather play baseball, instead of going to their aunt’s party. Rafa speaks to Leti and some other girls but we are not completely sure if anything happens with the girls. In this story their father is cheating and the children know about his mistress. In the third story the boyfriend loves Aurora but it seems to be an abusive relationship on both parts, they take and use from each other either for sex or drugs. But he does say that he is in love with Aurora. The fourth story Aguantando, there is the mother that struggles to take care of her family. It is over nine years and she reminds faithful to a husband that is no long in the marriage. I wrote these mini summaries because each story surrounded a negative. Each story showed that purity is tainted based on life styles and locations that you were brought up in. It’s just crazy that a child is exposed to all of this but some children grow quicker than others because society forces them to.

 Lines that stood out to me
In the campo we were friends. (5)
People around here don’t bet worth a damn, he was saying. (8)
We both knew Papi had been with that Puerto Rican woman he was seeing and wanted to wash off the evidence quick.  (23)
She smelled like herself, like the wind through as tree. (24)
When we were alone he treated me much better, like maybe I was his son or something. (35)
I knew an interrogation when I hear one, no matter how sugar-coated it was. (39)
This is how I always figured Papi would be exposed, out in public, where everybody would know. (40)
She holds it lightly, debating if she should smoke a few or sell the pack to somebody. (55)
I didn’t know that he’d abandoned us. That this waiting for him was all a shame. (70)

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Nov 15 2010

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In defense of Faulkner

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Okay I so I’m going to defend Faulkner because I’m going through so many blog’s and everyone is saying that they were disappointed and they expected something else. Yes, previously I wrote that I expected a different ending. I think we expect reassuring, informative, and happy ever afters because of books we have previously read in our life. Sorry to burst the bubble but Faulkner from the very beginning had a different style of writing. If anything I’d like to say we should have expected an odd ending. I mean he did begin the book with more of a middle section. Besides I think it was a journey making the connections through the book. He didn’t let you forget about the other sections because they were the memories that made the present understandable. After reading the negative I want to focus on the positives. Long story short I would read the book again probably notice a few more interesting things.

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Nov 15 2010

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10/28 Illumination

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Benjy’s relationship with Caddy is up for discussion. During his section Benjy is always clinging to Caddy. He listens to her when she speaks and follows her directions. I found it interesting that Caddy makes Benjy feel happy and is able to comfort him. But Benjy has the ability to make her feel disgusted and disappointed with herself. Caddy returns from a date, she was able to face her parents; she doesn’t seem to consider their feelings about her interaction with a male. Instead she considers her brothers feelings. “Her eyes flew at me, and away.”(68) She can’t even face him but I only assume it is because she is disappointed with herself. “I went toward her, crying, and she shrank against the wall” (69) she seems to fear his judgment because she doesn’t want him to know what she has done. But Benjy already senses a difference within her. Before that night she was pure sweet Caddy that simply smelled like trees.  He also focus on her eyes he says “Her eyes ran…I saw her eyes” I feel like she fears that her eyes will tell the truth. Lastly when she tries to hide from Benjy by putting her arm across her face I think she is disgusted with herself and he has made her feel so belittled by simply crying and starring at her.

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Nov 15 2010

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10/26 April 7, 1928 Come alive already!

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I would love to lie and say the book came alive at a certain point and I began to understand everything but I wont because instead I felt like I was thrown into the middle of a story and I had to fight in order to put the puzzle together. I questioned what was the problem with Benjy and what part of the memory connected to the past or the present. At times I felt like saying “hold on there Buddy, no more italic memories! You explain this first.” But I didn’t have Faulkner around to explain. I was also confused about Benjy’s age because at one point he is 33 and I only know this because of the birthday cake. Since there is so much reflection on the past I seriously thought the book was going to be about time traveling. I know it’s irrelevant to even mention that but, I was that lost or maybe I’ve been reading too much science fiction. But I will say Faulkner knows how to keep you interested because you are reading more thinking there will be an explanation.

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Nov 15 2010

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10/21 The sequence of frames…

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While reading Persepolis I found her relationships with god and religion most interesting. On page 6 Satrapi said she was the last prophet. Then on page 8 she speaks to god and informs him that she is not ready to be a prophet. As she obtains knowledge about the revolution she begins to come away from god. Then on page 13 she no longer even wants to speak of becoming a prophet. These frames seem to show the gradual decrease in Satrapi’s connection and believe in god. After these pages god does not appear to her as often. The last time god appears to her is after the execution of her uncle Anoosh. She tells god “get out of my life!!! I never want to see you” (70) she has completely broken away from god. The child that once wanted to be the great prophet turned away from god entirely. After commanding god out of her life she is lost and floating in space. I thought it was interesting that after she turns her back on god the bombing occurs.

The last part that stood out to me was on page 125. The reason this stood out to me was because there is such misery within one page. Because this story is written in comic form I did not take it so seriously. But these frames actually made me feel the strong emotion sadness. The 18 year old communist was executed and Satrapi’s uncle dies before seeing his son one last time. The uncles’ death could have been avoided if he had received the care for his heart attack. “The real passport arrived the same day” (he was buried) this line made me feel such anger because the government had been too late to save a life. I think the real reason this frame pissed me off so much was because my mother also had a heart attack. I felt like the government took away Satrapi’s uncle from his family. The last word at bottom “he never got to see his son” added to the anger and sadness that accumulated within me. After these frames I read Satrapi’s story very differently because besides the revolution she tried to live a normal life.

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Nov 15 2010

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Persepolis the Islamic Revolution

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10/19

Satrapi, as she is telling her story she keeps events a lined with the actual history of the Islamic Revolution. She reflected on the Shah being over thrown. Soon after this the Islamic Republic came into power.
The Islamic Revolution was against the influence of the West, but Satrapi points out oil had a strong influence as well. She makes it obvious that the extremist were against westernization. She wrote about when she bought smuggled in cassettes and the time her parents also smuggled in posters from Turkey. Satrapi writes about actual restrictions on women, parties, music, and cinemas. As I read Persepolis I thought perhaps she exaggerated but history only confirms it. What I would think is unimaginable is actually her reality.

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Nov 09 2010

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April 8, 1928

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I have mixed feelings about the ending because it’s not exactly what I expected. I thought Caddy would make an appearance any moment because in her letter we get the impression that she will be checking up on Miss Quentin. I also thought that once Caddy would return, the family would be united and Benjy would finally have her back in his life. I was disappointed because I wanted some comfort or justice for Benjy.  I guess I was looking for the overly exaggerated happy ever after. Instead Miss Quentin takes her money back from Jason. She takes back money that was rightfully hers, so I’m not disappointed in her. To an extent I want to believe that eventual miss Quentin goes back to her mother Caddy because earlier in the third section she asked why she couldn’t go back to her mother. But then again we’ve Miss Quentin and she most likely ran way with the man with the red tie. As for Jason’s downfall I say good for him because he had such a rotten personality. He deserves every bit of misfortune t because he focused so much on causing others misery.  Had he been kind to Miss Quentin, all of this would have been avoided.

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Nov 04 2010

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”April 6, 1928″

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AHHHHHHH!! This section seems to be so strongly connected with the first section. After thinking so hard about what is clarified, at I first thought okay, Caddy is no longer with Herbert because he learns the child is not his. Also Caddy’s mother doesn’t seem to want any connection with her daughter, but she does take in the baby Quentin. At first I thought this was perhaps the third Quentin that would be introduced in the book. Then it all hit me the female Quentin from April 7th 1928 is the same Quentin Jason seems to argue with on April 6th 1928. Everyone else probably already understood this but for me it was such a revelation. So I looked back to when Benjy sees her with her ‘beau” Jack on page 48 and the connection thickened! Benjy notices his RED TIE, he says “He had a red tie. The sun was red on it.”(49)  This is the very man Jason sees Quentin with. I have to say this intertwining that Faulkner creates through out the sections is incredible.

 This not relevant to the assignment but as I read Jason’s section I kept on thinking how much I hated him. He was always shown such affection by his mother, he was never treated cruelly. How could he grow up to become such a money hungry, cold hearted, conniving, cynical, twisted minded person? He does not care for anyone but himself. He steals from his mother, sister, and niece. My harsh feeling toward him formulate when Caddy is secretly at the graveyard, I believe her father has passed and she has also put flowers by Quentin’s grave. She begs Jason to let her see little Quentin, and all he is interested in is how much money she is willing to pay. He takes a hundred dollars from her and basically teases her because he literally lets her see Quentin less than a minute because he has Mink drive away as he is showing her the baby. The heart breaking things is that Caddy is actually running after the car.  Jason finds such enjoyment in the misery he causes others.

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